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Citrus Nursery Levels Up

Citrus Nursery Levels Up

2022-04-11

Article by: Hari Yellina

Using remote sensing technologies, a CITRUS nursery has redesigned its entire business operation. One of Australia’s leading citrus production nurseries is Golden Grove Nursery in Torbanlea, Queensland. In collaboration with Hort Innovation and the Australian Government’s National Landcare Program, the company has been involved in a strategic levy-funded initiative named “Digital remote monitoring to improve horticulture’s environmental performance.” It has installed a new revolutionary irrigation control system, remote video monitors, new environmental monitoring devices, and redesigned horticultural tree stock growing media as a result of this.

Data is uploaded to the cloud and displayed live on a screen in the office, eliminating the need to manually enter data into spreadsheets. The monitoring sensors provide the nursery workers with a comprehensive picture of the crop’s needs as it progresses through various growth phases and weather occurrences. The goal of the strategic collaboration is to stimulate the adoption of technology that will assist Australian horticultural enterprises in improving decision-making abilities, production efficiencies, labour utilisation, and environmental performance.

Wayne Parr, a fourth-generation citrus producer and Golden Grove director, said the company is ecstatic to be a part of the project since it places a strong emphasis on innovation. Mr Parr explained, “It will give Golden Grove Nursery the skills and knowledge to adopt the newest technologies and trendsetting concepts to revolutionise our growth processes.” The monitoring sensors provide the nursery workers with a comprehensive picture of the crop’s needs as it progresses through various growth phases and weather occurrences.

The goal of the strategic collaboration is to stimulate the adoption of technology that will assist Australian horticultural enterprises in improving decision-making abilities, production efficiencies, labour utilisation, and environmental performance. Wayne Parr, a fourth-generation citrus producer and Golden Grove director, said the company is ecstatic to be a part of the project since it places a strong emphasis on innovation. Mr Parr explained, “It will give Golden Grove Nursery the skills and knowledge to adopt the newest technologies and trendsetting concepts to revolutionise our growth processes.”

However, production for a variety of crops, including avocado, macadamia, and ornamental plant cultivation, has been developed to efficiently exploit the full potential of shifting market demands. The production nursery currently supplies more than 200,000 nursery trees per year to the Queensland citrus sector and other fruit tree businesses (with a capacity of 240,000 nursery trees). “Improving labour efficiency is another major area of focus; we intend to build more streamlined nursery operations and growth practises by embracing innovative technology,” Mr Parr said. “These innovative procedures will help commercial growers produce a higher-quality, uniform crop by reducing crop growth cycle durations.” “As a result of this project, we have reimagined our entire business operation and are incredibly excited to reap the rewards of investing in innovative technology, creating a thriving, sustainable business,” he said.